Maroggia’s Mill Cookbook: Paprika Puff Pastry Crescents / Il Ricettario del Mulino di Maroggia: Cornetti di pasta sfoglia alla paprika

cornetti-pasta-sfoglia-paprika-1

Here we are with our usual appointment with Maroggia’s Mill and its Cookbook. Today’s recipe is homemade puff pastry, a recipe I spent several days working on many years ago in order to find the perfect recipe as you can well see my numerous posts on millefeuille. I re-tested the recipe a few months ago using only Maroggia’s Mill flour and, needless to say, the result was excellent. On this occasion I tweaked the basic recipe with savoury pies and croissants in mind and decided to add sweet paprika powder to the flour. This puff pastry is ideal for small pies and finger food to nibble on before dinner. I shaped them into crescent shape, a form that lends itself very well to various fillings (but I haven’t filled them…I am on a diet!).
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Maroggia’s Mill Cookbook: Feta, Tropea Red Onion and Sumac Panzerotti / Il Ricettario del Mulino di Maroggia: Panzerotti alla feta, cipolle di Tropea e Sumac

panzerotto-feta-cipolla-tropea-sumac-1

When I was a little girl right before Christmas it was tradition that I, my older sister and my father would go shopping in Milan on a Saturday. A special event, an opportunity for us to spend some time alone with our Daddy, who was often away from home for business matters. On this same Friday, but twenty-eight years ago, I would be counting the money safely stored in my piggy bank, waiting impatiently for the next morning to come. To my eyes Milan was magical place. I recall the bitter cold which would redden our cheeks and noses. The snow would fall slowly, in fine grains that almost did not leave a trace on the sidewalks. And all those lights, bright lights everywhere.

After long walks in the centre of the city and a due visit to Rinascente and Fiorucci where we would usually find little presents for our mom and friends we would happily end our Christmas pilgrimage at a mythical place: Luini. Luini and its warm to piping hot panzerotti, for which we would patiently wait in line, that same line that in the past years split into three to four separate ones in order to greet as much costumers as possible. Panzerotti must be eaten standing up, preferably leaning against a free portion of one of the walls of the buildings along Via Santa Radegonda 16, not to lose crispness of the dough and lava texture of the filling, which for me will always and only ever be tomato and mozzarella.

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Maroggia’s Mill Cookbook: Mock panettone with candied orange and dark chocolate / Il Ricettario del Mulino di Maroggia: Finti panettoncini all’arancia candita e cioccolato fondente

Finti panettoncini all'arancia candita e cioccolato fondente 1

It has been hanging around for a long time, this thought. Unfortunately having many things to do and little time to stop and think and do something about it…but I couldn’t stop thinking this blog was born thanks to my passion for sourdough but lately my recipes have been increasingly lacking this ingredient. What happened? Nothing serious, some of it is to blame on the discovery of long fermentation which can make yeasted bread more digestible and fresh for longer time, just like sourdough bread. A little blame is on “Cuochi d’artificio” for which I decided to restrain myself to the use of yeast, being sourdough leavening too complex. And last but not least lately time to plan refreshments and dough rising has failed me big time.

At the first occasion I knew I had to do something about it. I threw a quick loving glance to the jar of my dear Hannibal Dolores Frank, my liquid sourdough culture, and rolled up my sleeves. In a jiffy I found the right ingredients and I started to put down, off the cuff, the recipe for these mock panettoncini fo Maroggia’s Mill Cookbook. Mock because mind you, panettone is a serious matter. The recipe is regulated by a disciplinary from which you can not escape, and the commitment needed to come up with a good homemade panettone is remarkable. This recipe in a way is no exception and I don’t recommend it to the faint of heart, or better faint of hand. Unless you are familiar with very hydrated or high in fat doughs, if you’re not quite skilled with handling and shaping breads I warn you nervous breakdown is around the corner waiting for you. But if you are experienced or daring enough go all the way and this recipe will not disappoint you. These little panettoni are perfect for a special, and why not romantic, breakfast. Soft as a pillow and sweet, I tell you. Bake them on a Saturday afternoon for Sunday morning. Pop them for a while in the oven before you tasting them while cocooning in the warmth comfort of your bed, wide smile under your cappuccino foam moustache. That’s amore!

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Maroggia’s Mill Cookbook: Savoury Vegan Babka with Black Olives and Sun-dried Tomatoes / Il Ricettario del Mulino di Maroggia: Babka salata vegana con olive nere e pomodori secchi

Brioche vegana con olive e pomodori secchi 1

I had been working on a new vegan dough for my last episode of “Cuochi d’artificio” a few months ago and fell in love with it. The use of cocoa butter has proved decisive for its softness, something I would never imagine possible without the use of butter. Having experimented with sweet dough I thought it might be interesting to develop a recipe for savoury brioche, and here it is. For the shaping I looked back to the good old babka (check out my Chocolate Babka and Licorice, White Chocolate and Strawberry Babka). The result? A pillowy soft, scrumptious, fragrant and summery bread! Even my friend Nevia, who is skeptical about “bread which has stuff in it” tried a slice and loved it! Perfect to whip up some Sunday brunch sandwiches, eaten alone or with a nice cream cheese.
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Maroggia’s Mill Cookbook: Liquorice Bagel / Il Ricettario del Mulino di Maroggia: Bagel alla liquirizia

bagel liquirizia : liquorice bagel 1

Bagels. If I’m not mistaken this is the second recipe I tried after discovering my passion for bread baking. The first one was the Cottage Loaf, a bread which has been the staple of my baking when sixteen. Around that time my father used to travel a lot to the United States, something which I guess summed up with my passion for american tv series and MTV played a role into feeding my interest for this bread. I then did a 10 day holiday in N.Y. where I religiously followed my plan to eat a typical american breakfast every single morning, with the rule of changing both menu and place every single day. Amongst the breakfast I had there where bagels too, of course. I would opt for a classic philadelpia cheese and smoked salmon bagel, straight from the oven and still warm. No doubt one of my favourite breakfasts during my american holiday. I haven’t been baking bagels since, for no reason really. This time a pretty weird idea to use Maroggia’s Mill flour came to my mind. Liquorice flavoured bagels! Take a look into Maroggia’s Mill Cookbook with me and let’s see how these beauties can be baked at home.

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“Cuochi d’artificio”: Bicycle! / “Cuochi d’artificio”: La bicicletta!

Bread Paris Brest

Bicycle! Bycicle!, when Alice proposed me this theme I clearly sensed her perplexity…what would I do of it? Was it feasible, with bread? Her uncertainty was palpable and I had to think quick in order to convince her everything would be fine and not miss this opportunity. Paris-Brest, of course! One of the most famous and popular French pâtisserie classics was created in 1910 by chef Louis Durand to commemorate the Paris–Brest–Paris bicycle race begun in 1891. It’s basically a wheel shaped choux filled with praline flavoured cream. What about a bread wheel, filled with a foie gras cream? To recreate the craquelin effect, a decorative crackly topping, I relied on the recipe for the topping for tiger bread rolls. The result? Simply stunning! Unfortunately due to ethical issues my first recipe for the filling was rejected. But since I personally find it amazing and love foie gras I decided to post it, in case you would like to try it. The recipe I cooked in the studio has more of a strong and rustic flavour, but is still very good.

Here you will find the list of ingredients needed and the directions to bake the bread and to whip up the filling (sorry it’s in Italian but I’m pretty sure google translate will be ok) and here you can find the whole episode with me explaining all the steps to bake this beauty at home. Are you ready?

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MTChallenge: Chestnut Honey and Feta Pizza / MTChallenge: Pizza al miele di castagno e feta

pizza feta e miele di castagno, chestnut honey and feta pizza 1

Here comes another month, here another MTChallenge. This time Eleonora and Michael, the two minds behind the blog Burro e Miele, threw their gauntlet not with a recipe but with an ingredient instead, and honey it is. Panic. This exact month is filled with work and new ideas, meetings, recipe testing and I won’t deny that such a great freedom within the challenge scares me a bit. In order not to exhaust myself I decided to keep a low profile, a very low one…but always with the desire to test new recipes and enjoy something different. Feta and honey have been a staple of Sunday brunches for a long time now and I’ve been crumbling feta on almost all of my white pizzas in the past years. It seemed to me like a perfect combination. A sweet and salty pizza, bring it on! The idea of putting honey directly into the dough is a winning one. Chestnut honey has a very distinctive taste and the result is pretty good…I already have been thinking of other recipes and I think I will be experimenting next Autumn. For the umpteenth time I want to thank MTC for being such a source of inspiration.

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Maroggia’s Mill Cookbook: Planetary Buns / Il Ricettario del Mulino di Maroggia: Panini planetari

Maroggia's Mill Cookbook- Planetary Buns - Il Ricettario del Mulino di Maroggia- Panini planetari 1

You wouldn’t suspect it. From the outside yet another bun, soft as a pillow no doubts about it, but perhaps a little bland for taste buds all too accustomed to the combination of white bun, chocolate, fruit juice. The staple of almost every kid’s mid day snack. But no don’t be fooled, these buns are planetary. A cosmos made out of cocoa and toasted hazelnuts in which a planet of soft-hearted chocolate floats, the milky way dough flavoured with tonka bean containing a primordial explosion of flavours. The bun you didn’t expect, which in itself contains all that is good, sweet, rewarding. An idea which originated from an assignment, may be too complex for the beginning of a new adventure. I’ll give as a gift to Maroggia’s Mill Cookbook then. I hope this makes you dream of starry nights and cocoa flavoured planets.

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Valais Rye Bread / Pane alla segale vallesana

Valais rye bread, pane segale vallesana 1

Whole wheat bread, rye bread. I simply love rustic breads, with their thick and tasty bread crumb. The fibers contained in these flours, in addition to being rich in vitamins and minerals, give bread a rough texture which I find very pleasant. During my last visit at Maroggia’s Mill I asked Alessandro to give me some rye flour from the Valais region, to make some tests in the kitchen. I tried to make Valais rye bread but unfortunately my first attempt didn’t turn out well and I decided to take it slow, since baking with this flour is not an easy task I added some strong bread flour. The result is a wonderful bread ideal to be consumed in the morning for breakfast. Filling, tasty and not heavy on digestion it matches perfectly with a spoonful of honey (well yes, for practical reasons and not to come out with a too minimalistic picture I had to cheat on my diet!) and, for those of you who can, a nice glass of cold milk. The crumb is very compact and is ideal to be smeared with honey and jams, but still remains very soft. With this recipe, I greet you and wish you a wonderful August, I decided to take a little break from recipes and post and will be starting to post again from September. Happy summer everyone!

Valais Rye Bread

Poolish
100 g Valais rye flour
200 g water
3 g instant yeast

Mix the dry ingredients, add the water and mix with a fork until there are no lumps.
Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let rise 2 hours at room temperature, then let stand in refrigerator for about 10 hours.

Dough
300 g poolish
70 g rye flour
180 g strong bread flour
15 g seed oil
7 g salt

Remove the poolish from the refrigerator 30′ before kneading and leave at room temperature.
Add the flour and salt and mix until the flour is almost completely absorbed, then add the oil and mix until you get a smooth mixture.
To prevent the dough from sticking moisten your hands several times.
Make two sets of folds, one on the short side and one on the long side of the dough and shape the dough into a sausage.
Put the dough in a 20×10 cm plumcake mold.
Cover with plastic wrap and let rise at room temperature for one hour.
Bake in the oven preheated to 230° C for about 20′, then lower the temperature to 180° C and bake for further 20′.
Out of the oven let cool on a wire rack.

Valais rye bread, pane segale vallesana 2

Pane alla segale vallesana

Pane integrale, pane di segale. Non so voi ma ho una vera e propria passione per i pani rustici, densi e saporiti. Le fibre delle farine integrali oltre che essere ricche di vitamine e sali minerali conferiscono al pane una texture grezza che trovo molto gradevole. Perciò alla mia ultima visita al Mulino di Maroggia ho chiesto ad Alessandro di darmi della farina di segale Vallesana per vedere un po’ i risultati in cucina. Ho provato a fare il pane di segale vallesano ma purtroppo con il mio primo tentativo non sono stata troppo fortunata e per il momento ho deciso di prenderla con calma affrontando questa farina un po’ difficile con una aggiunta di farina bianca nostrana. Il risultato è uno splendido pane che ben si presta per essere consumato la mattina a colazione. Saziante, saporito e per nulla pesante è perfetto gustato con un velo di miele (eh sì per ragioni pratiche del blog per non fare una foto troppo scarna ho dovuto fare un piccolo sgarro alla mia dieta!) e, per voi che potete, un bel bicchierone di latte freddo. La mollica è molto compatta, dunque ideale per essere spalmata con miele e marmellate, pur rimanendo molto morbida. Con questa ricetta vi saluto e vi auguro uno splendido mese di Agosto, mese per il quale ho deciso di prendermi una piccola pausa da ricette e post. Ci rivediamo a Settembre!

Pane alla segale vallesana

Poolish
100 g farina di segale vallesana
200 g acqua
3 g lievito di birra istantaneo

Mescolate gli ingredienti secchi e poi aggiungere l’acqua e amalgamare con una forchetta finché non ci saranno grumi.
Ricoprite la ciotola con pellicola alimentare e lasciate lievitare 2 ore a temperatura ambiente, dopodiché lasciate riposare in frigorifero 10 ore.

Impasto
300 g poolish
70 g farina di segale
180 g farina bianca nostrana oppure farina 0
15 g olio di semi
7 g sale marino

Togliete il poolish dal frigorifero 30′ prima di impastare e lasciatelo a temperatura ambiente.
Unite le farine e il sale marino e impastate finché la farina sarà quasi completamente assorbita, dopodiché unite l’olio e impastate finché otterrete un composto omogeneo.
Per evitare che l’impasto si appiccichi alle mani bagnatele più volte.
Fate due serie di pieghe, una sul lato corto e una sul lato lungo dell’impasto e formate un salsicciotto.
Bagnatevi le mani e formate un salsicciotto che stia in uno stampo per plumcake di 20×10 cm.
Coprite con pellicola alimentare e lasciate lievitare a temperatura ambiente un’ora.
Iniziate la cottura in forno preriscaldato a 230° C, per 20′, dopodiché abbassate la temperatura a 180° C e cuocete per ulteriori 20′.
Fuori dal forno fate raffreddare su di una gratella.

Maroggia’s Mill Cookbook: Cinnamon and Almond Croissants / Il Ricettario del Mulino di Maroggia: Croissants alla cannella e mandorle

Cinnamon and Almond Croissants - Croissants alla cannella e mandorle 1

As previously mentioned in the post about madeleines for Maroggia’s Mill Cookbook I haven’t been posting sweet recipes anymore, given my macrobiotic diet. Here I indulge with another sweet recipe which calls for a lot of butter too. We’re not born to suffer, are we? Croissants is one difficult recipe I finally managed to bake properly last year, but as you know one never stops learning or experimenting. This time I tried substituting cow’s milk with oat milk and used margarine in the dough instead of butte, just for a change. The result is very good, although I’ll never stop experimenting until I will achieve the perfect layers! I added cinnamon to both the dough and filling but nothing prevents you to experiment and create your own personal recipe, even a savoury version. I recommend you take your time and above all be patient. Read throughout the tips below and watch the videos i linked, especially the one by Envie de bien manger. They will help you get good results. Continue reading / Continua a leggere…